Needlepoint Supports New Schools In War-Torn Pakistan

Pakistani women in Punjab province have learned to embrioder — and are selling their needlework in western Nevada County to support schools where they learn to read, write and figure.
Pakistani women in Punjab province have learned to embrioder and are selling their needlework in western Nevada County to support schools where they learn to read, write and figure.

Poor families in Pakistan are supporting education initiatives by creating needlepoint pieces and sending them over to the U.S.A. for sale.

“To make the schools self-supporting, the women also have been learning for the first time to create needlepoint and embroidered pieces that they could sell profitably in the United States, with its higher currency value.”

I should note that in addition to the fine goal of increasing education in that country, the initiative also advances the noble cause of spreading needlepoint joy throughout the world.

New Website Dedicated to Threadbands

Screenshot of the Threadbands.com Home Page
Screenshot of the Threadbands.com Home Page

I put together a website that is dedicated to the new product I discussed in a previous post about Needlepoint Headband Kits. It’s called Threadbands.com, appropriately enough, and it serves to introduce the product to the world, and to help with working on the project.

It will also direct you to the best place to buy threadbands, and where to send your questions.

New Tefillin Bag Designs

I recently uploaded 3 new Tefillin Bag designs to the site, and I wanted to call them out here on the blog.

The first of these is a tad on the traditional side, with all the flowery silvery flourishes and stuff:

Flourish Tefillin Bag
Flourish Tefillin Bag

Lots of room for a name on that one. I chose to depict it with the names of the famous Chida, since he’s got four of ’em.

Next is the tefillin bag with a familiar-looking tartan design:

Tefillin Bag Camel Tartan
Tefillin Bag Camel Tartan

I dare not call it what it is *cough* Burberry *cough* or those lawyers will be after me in no time flat. Finally, here is the Argyle Tefillin Bag:

Tefillin Bag Argyle
Tefillin Bag Argyle

Now that’s what I call an original design. Remember that all of these canvases can be customized with the name of the bar-mitzva boy, in either English or Hebrew or both.

Click on any of the images to be escorted safely to the product page of each of these. To purchase them, saunter on over to Judaica Needlepoint’s Tefillin Bag Category page.

New Product From Pepita Needlepoint: Threadbands!

The "Vineyard" Threadband
The "Vineyard" Threadband

We’ve developed a new product that is picking up some momentum. It’s a needlepoint headband kit, which we’re calling “Threadbands”, and it contains everything you need to stitch and finish a headband.

Check out these beauties right here: Needlepoint Headband Kits. To buy them, ask your local needlepoint shop, or you can get them from Pointseller.com, under the Wearables section.

Does Printed Needlepoint Canvas Last 600 Years?

An Old Printing Device
An Old Printing Device

Here’s an email recently received by the folks at Pointseller.com:

I would like to know why you think your printed canvas is superior to handpainted. It has been my experience that the printed canvas does not have the life of a handpainted canvas. Tapestries from the 1400’s have lasted 600 years. Will yours? Doubtful.!!!

Here was my response:

To quote “from experience” that printed needlepoint canvas doesn’t last 600 years, is quite an interesting claim. To my knowledge, printed canvas is only around for a few years, so it isn’t possible to have conducted this type of experiment.

 

In fact, I had some of my designs handpainted by an offshore shop, and compared them to my printed versions. I couldn’t find any appreciable difference.

 

Indeed, my printed canvases have proven themselves durable and up to the task. The cost of a printed canvas compared to handpainted, inch per inch, is far more economical and much faster to produce. And in the end, both printed and painted designs will be covered with stitching. The quality of the design is the most important factor in choosing a canvas, not the method with which the ink was applied.

One of these days I will need to post a longer article on the pros and cons of printed vs. handpainted needlepoint. But the email I quoted above does cover the main points.

Another Fine Example of Needlepoint Appreciation

Check out Appraisal Day Offered at the Daily Tribune of Oakland County, where another needlepoint canvas was appraised by experts with an especially fine appreciation of needlework:

We’ve had things appraised as high as $50,000, said Colleen Barkham, a historical society member and organizer of the event. It was a needlepoint that came from England, 300 years old.

Sadly, no picture of the pricey point was included.

New Designs Released This Week

Hi there all, I’d like to share with you some of the new designs released this week. I had a bunch of unfinished projects that I finally finished and cleared out of my todo list.

From my collection of “Coloring Book” style of designs, I bring to you “Doggie and Soldier”:

Doggie and Soldier
Doggie and Soldier

The pair of playthings have joined their friends in the Charming Illustration category. Next, I have “Banister”:

Banister
Banister

It will find a welcome home under my Home Sweet Home collection with all my other dandy decor depictions. After that, please join me in greeting “Beach Chairs”:

Beach Chairs
Beach Chairs

The perfect piece to stitch while relaxing in a beach chair under the brilliant sun. And now, introducing “Kitchen Utensils”:

Kitchen Utensils
Kitchen Utensils

As Benjamin Franklin once said, we need to all hang together. Last, we have “Shalom”:

Shalom

And what a better way to end this blog post: Shalom, everyone!