Same Idea, Different Results

challah-cover-middle-strip-chocolate

This is it.  The navy and copper challah cover banner style that I referred to in the last post.  It is finished in copper and navy ultrasuede.  It is stitched in the diagonal hedge row stitch in DMC perle cotton #3 alternating with Kreinik medium braid #16 060.

It’s fascinating how the same idea can be stitched differently.  The two challah covers don’t even look like first cousins.

The summer projects are all back from the finisher. Check back often as I show off some of my customers’ masterpieces!

Another Time Saving Tip for Challah Cover Needlepoint Projects

Challah Cover Banner

Challah Cover Banner

In May this year I blogged about how to quickly stitch a challah cover by just stitching the center. Here is another idea, where I stitch a swath across the middle from end to end, and add material to the top and the bottom to fill it out. This reduced stitching time by about two thirds, and the results are very impressive.

I have a customer doing this project in copper and navy, and another one (on bed rest due to a complicated pregnancy) doing it in burgundy and gold. I’ll post those pictures when I have them.

Save Time When Stitching a Challah Cover

Pepita Needlepoint Challah Cover

Challah Cover

 

I love stitching challah cover needlepoint kits. They are big canvases with plenty of room for creativity. But for some customers, stitching a project of this magnitude can be daunting.

Creating a large challah cover doesn’t need to take so long. Try stitching just the center of a challah cover and have the finisher do the rest. This reduces the cost of canvas, the amount of thread required, and most important, stitching time.

I designed the Challah Cover Chocolate Stained Glass backwards.  I found faux crocodile leather in a chocolate bark color.  I loved the sheen and texture.  I loved the richness of the hues of browns ingrained in the “pleather.”  The stained glass design is originally a tallit bag in royal blue and colorful glass, but I tweaked it to work as a challah cover. I matched thread to the material and started stitching.

You can see the results in the image at the top of this post. At the moment, it is in a window display on Coney Island Avenue in Brooklyn, New York.

I have another challah cover design at the finisher that uses a variation of this technique.  It is a banner style finished with strips of suede on top and on bottom of the canvas. I stitched the banner strip in shades of dove blue/teal using DMC perle cotton # 926 and 927 and Kreinik #16 4012.  As soon as it’s back, I’ll blog about it.