The Dress that Broke the Internet



So there’s this dress that broke the internet with a debate.  Most see it as blue and black while others view it as white and gold.  Aha, a controversy. This sounds familiar… When I create a new needlepoint design and match colors… well, let’s just say that people see things differently. For example, DMC 834.  Is it gold, or yellow, or green gold?  Which one is navy – 939 or 823?  Is 318 grey or blue?  And, no, I don’t mean dye lot. I am not even going there. That’s another debate altogether.

It’s fascinating to examine identical finished needlepoint canvases that were sold at two separate shops.  Most of the time, they will resemble one another, but not always.  The way the stitcher “sees” and interprets the design may be so different that the finished designs look like distant cousins.


Friday the 13th?


Do people still believe that Friday the 13th brings bad luck?  Personally, I think February 29th is worse.  If you are born on the leap year day, you hardly ever get to celebrate your birthday properly.

According to snopes, Friday the 13th can be traced back to many generations ago. Individuals avoided all sorts of activities on that day.  It is considered an “ancient superstition.”   Some declared Friday as a day of bad luck in general.  Read more at

Excerpt from snopes:

“Friday was also said to be a particularly unlucky day on which to undertake anything that represented a beginning or the start of a new venture, thus we find references to all of the following activities as endeavors best avoided on Fridays: Needleworking: “I knew an old lady who, if she had nearly completed a piece of needlework on a Thursday, would put it aside unfinished, and set a few stitches in her next undertaking, that she might not be obliged either to begin the new task on Friday or to remain idle for a day.”   (1883)”



Eugene Chernin is Closing


I’ll miss you, Eugene Chernin.  You believed in me when I had this tiny business all those years ago.  You gave me wings to fly and soar. You gently taught me the ropes about pearl cotton #3 and #5.  Recently you opened a website, and I was able to place my orders online.  Nevertheless, there was always someone warm and friendly to talk to.  I knew my orders were taken care of.  You had that old fashioned charm.

So thank you, my friends George and Mark!  If you ever need any needlepoint canvases, you know where to find me.  Good Luck and like you always said, Zei Gezunt!

The Story Behind My Fancy Pillow


Audrey Rosner, CPNP, is one of my favorite friends. I was a pediatric patient at her office when I was a little girl, and now care for my children.  Audrey is a grandmother by now, and she stitches a gift for each grandchild. Girls get siddur covers, and boys receive tefillin bags.

Audrey wanted to stitch a weave pattern for her current project.  I reconstructed the stitch from a sample she provided and was intrigued enough to stitch it too.  Barry requested a pillow to coordinate with our brown leather couch.  As I stitched (on a blank canvas, mind you),  I was hesitant since it really looked like nothing special.  But lo and behold, the finisher finished it so awesomely, it is now a stunning addition to my stitched sample menagerie.

And thank you, Audrey!  It is an honor to have you as my customer.

Mazel Tov to Yossi Frank on his Bar Mitzvah!

Needlepointed Tefillin Bag

Needlepointed Tefillin Bag

Mazel Tov to my dear son, Yossi, on his Bar Mitzvah!  Yes, I know the tefillin bag was ready over a year ago.  Well, he is proudly using it every morning.  He’s getting lots of compliments on his bag.  His Bar Mitzvah dinner was beautiful.  He outdid himself with his speech.  Mazel Tov to the Frank and Friedman families!  Yossi, we hope to have lots of Yiddish Nachas from you and all our children.

Tallit Tree of Life with Pomegranates


Our customer Phoebe B. placed a custom order with us for a tallit tree of life canvas with pomegranates growing on the trees in lieu of the flower buds usually there.  Look at her stunning results!  The contrast of the rich colors is what I like best about the finished bag. It is also immaculately stitched.

Thanks, Phoebe, for giving us the opportunity to enjoy the “fruits of your labor!”